Galaxies & Cosmology winter trimester  2010-2011
 syllabus   &  course expectations

safety, tardy, classroom computer use, and honesty

Universe/publisher link:  register as a student to use the resources

 Astronomy Picture of the Day        the latest astrophysics discoveries
  what's up in the 
sky this week

  Monday,
February 14
Tuesday,
February 15
Wednesday,
February 16
class


presentations of findal projects

presentation should be 7 minutes max
(and be practiced!)

2 minutes for questions

2 minutes for transition

what counts:
correctness of results in presentation
substantiveness of project
clarity of presentation

to hand in:
max 3 pages, including results
and how you did what you did
reading
(always done before class)
back to the DARK AGES:
27(6)
Scientific American articles for further reading

The Cosmic Symphony
(the CMB)

The Dark Ages

The First Stars


questions you should know the answer to before coming to class
we'll continue discussing the graph of the CMB in 26(8) and any time left we'll spend on the dark ages



homework
(written assignments
to be turned in)




web stuff
computer simulations of the first structure formation:

galaxy formation

star formation


lab



news/discoveries
of the week
first stars were not loners


 
  Monday,
February 7
Tuesday,
February 8
Wednesday,
February 9
Thursday,
February 10
Friday,
February 11
class
make sure that you have your WHITE book

EVERY DAY THIS WEEK!
butchered schedule

homework to bring to class: the time-temperature relationship for a matter-dominated universe
homework to bring to class: the time-temperature relationship for a radiation-dominated universe

reading
(always done before class)

27(3,4):

so many things happening in so little time



nothing new
 review: 27(3,4)

new:  27(5)

nothing new,
we are still in 27(5)
26(8), the last section in chapter 26 on the CMB and "that graph"

also parts related to the CMB on pp. 700-701
and
pp. 704-705
(the WMAP picture)

even better reading

WMAP releases 7-year results


FOR MONDAY:
back to the DARK AGES:
27(6)

questions you should know the answer to before coming to class
block D:

dont even think of coming to class without knowing what's wrong with figures 26-10, -11
(assuming a flat universe)

all blocks:

what are the 5 most interesting events that happened in the first 5 minutes of the universe (gleaned only from sections 3 and 4 of chapter 27)?




what are the 5 most interesting events that happened in the first 5 minutes of the universe (gleaned only from sections 3 and 4 of chapter 27)?

THAT HAPPENED!

(not problems, not things that happened in the first microsecond -- speculating about anything earlier than the first microsecond is just silly: we dont know the physics

check the 5 scales in the WHITE BOOK....
which are uniform across the universe?
which are not?



what is "that graph" plotting?
what does it mean?

clean-up from yesterday:
can you finish the calculation we were in the midst of?
(the ratio of the number of electrons that found a positron to annihilate with to the number of electrons that didn't find a positron to annihilate with)



homework
(written assignments
to be turned in)


work on final project all this week (including yesterday)
prove that the universe's stars  could not have possibly have converted anywhere near 28% of the universe's matter into helium during its entire lifetime.

the galaxy's luminosity is 1037 W

its mass is 4 x 1041 kg

you know the efficiency of the H -> He reaction

and you know the age of the universe

 


to be brought to class today:

find the time-temperature relation for a radiation dominated universe....

put it in the form

T  =  ( some number in Kelivin) x
(t/1 sec)p

where t is the age of the universe in seconds and p is some power


web stuff





lab





news/discoveries
of the week








Monday,
January 31
Tuesday,
February 1
Wednesday,
February 2
Thursday,
February 3
Friday,
February 4
class




make sure that you have your WHITE book
reading
(always done before class)

25(3, 4) 

the last two sections in
the quasar section...

bring questions!

25(5)  again

know how what we see depends on the view

how does the spectrum that we get depend on the view
the GREEN handout on radio-quiet and radio-loud AGNs
(plus, of course, your knowledge gained from reading chapter 25)

22(4) on gamma-ray bursts

a Scientific American article on gamma-ray bursts (with better color pictures)

the beginning of the beginning:
the Big Bang

26(3, 4)
26(5)


things you should know the
answer to before coming to class








have you a project?

have you talked to me
about it?

write up a half-page or so description of what you intend to do and, most importantly, what observational data you need to have

for the AGN model

(write down some observations as a function of viewing angle)

what observational features should we see as a function of the direction we look?
for example.... one very obvious thing YOU need to explain is why we would see broad lines at one angle and narrow lines at a different angle (that's one observational feature that they gave you, although they left it up to you to explain why)


for gamma-ray bursts

(bring 2 columns of notes)

what are the observational properties of the two types of gamma-ray bursts?

what is out model for each type?

how did we get from the observations to the models?



left overs on gamma-ray bursts from yesterday
(block D is very behind)



new stuff?

what are the
3 pieces of observational evidence that a Big Bang
(common origin; hot dense epoch of the universe)?

(we have actually talked about the three pieces throughout both trimesters!)

how/why does each piece of evidence point to a Big Bang?


when did the universe change from opaque to transparent?

what caused the change?

at what temperature (based on what we did last september) should this transition take place?

why is the book trying to palm off a different temperature on us?

since the universe is opaque at times earlier than this, can we see back before then?
how?
or why not?

homework
(written assignments
to be turned in)


1) use dimensional
analysis to find the
"classical" electron
scattering radius
(it's dependent on
ke, e, c, and me)....
follow the procedure you
were instructed to earlier
in the trimester (that not
everyone did).... you will
end up with 4 equations in
4 unknowns (w,x,y,z) and
THEN solve the
equations... (i.e., do not
just announce the
solution)

2) then substitute the
numerical values of the
constants to find the
numerical value of re

(make sure that it's
reasonable)

3) then go back to the net
force equation that we
wrote in class and rewrite
it and put in all constants
to arrive at the eddington
limit luminosity (which
must be put in the form in
the text)

NOTE: you wont get the
book's answer.... because
there are two things i left
out (block C knows about
1 and maybe even 2;
block D knows about
neither, so their answer
will about 4000x smaller
than the book's)






coming attractions:

prove that the universe's stars  could not have possibly have converted anywhere near 28% of the universe's matter into helium during its entire lifetime.

the galaxy's luminosity is 1037 W

its mass is 4 x 1041 kg

you know the efficiency of the H -> He reaction

and you know the age of the universe
web stuff





lab





news/discoveries
of the week

Hubble finds the most
distant galaxy ever seen






Kepler finds 1285 (possible) extrasolar planets

from the Kepler web site:
Kepler mission has discovered its first Earth-size planet candidates and its first candidates in the habitable zone, a region where liquid water could exist on a planet's surface. Five of the potential planets are near Earth-size and orbit in the habitable zone of smaller, cooler stars than our sun.


Teenagers, Friends, and Bad Decisions

pages for january 2010
pages for december 2010
pages for november 2010
pages for october 2010
pages for september 2010 
pages for august 2010